Man holds model of the Titanic at the Titanic Belfast museum, Northern Ireland; Copyright Peter Morrison, AP.

Man holds model of the Titanic at the Titanic Belfast museum, Northern Ireland (Copyright Peter Morrison/AP)

ONE hundred years ago, the sinking of the Titanic was a tragic disaster. Today, it's fodder for an entertaining outing with the kids.

There are replica ships in Tennessee and Missouri, graveyard tours in New York and Nova Scotia, traveling exhibits from Las Vegas to Atlanta, and two brand new museums in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and Southampton, England. Bars and restaurants are serving Titanic dinners, and ships are even heading to the disaster site -- including an anniversary cruise that slashed prices last-minute from nearly $5,000 to $1,000. Here's a roundup of notable Titanic events and attractions here and abroad.

And from Premier Exhibitions, Inc., the company that brought you "Bodies: The Exhibition," Titanic exhibits are also on display at the Luxor Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the Natural History Museum in San Diego, The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich., on International Drive in Orlando, at Union Station in Kansas City, and opening soon at Atlantic Station in Atlanta.

Take part in the anniversary at a theater near you with the 3-D re-release of James Cameron's movie.

Many hotels and restaurants are offering Titanic-themed packages and menus. The St. Regis Atlanta is hosting "100 Years & 100 Bottles," an April 10 reception featuring champagne, cocktails and hors d'oeuvres inspired by the last dinner aboard the ship. A $95, 10-course Titanic menu at the Blackfish restaurant in Philadelphia on April 15 includes oysters, squab and poached peaches. Molly Brown's great-granddaughter will attend a six-course Titanic-inspired meal April 14 at Denver's Oxford Hotel.

Pigeon Forge and Branson: It's a long, long way from any ocean, but Titanic museums in Branson, Mo., and in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., have hosted more than 7 million visitors since 2006 and claim to house some of the largest permanent collections anywhere of Titanic artifacts and memorabilia. The museums are actual half-scale replicas of the Titanic and are co-owned by John Joslyn, who was co-leader of the first private expedition to visit the shipwreck. Museum visitors get the boarding pass of a Titanic passenger or crew member when they enter, and at the end of the tour, they learn whether their passenger lived or died.